Nathan Woelfel Outdoors Podcast – Episode 38: Reflecting on 2022 outdoor goals

It’s Episode 38 of The Nathan Woelfel Outdoors Podcast, the final episode of 2022.

As the year comes to a close, I revisit the outdoors-related goals I set for myself at the beginning of the year and reflect upon my hunting and fishing adventures, as well as the growth of the website. 

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Catching a miracle

When my family and I find ourselves trolling the waters of Lake Michigan on warm summer evenings, we get a lot of time to chat.

A semi-frequent topic of conversation is an estimation of the actual odds of getting a fish on the end of our line.

We generally always land a couple of fish on our trips on the big pond. But, think about it: what are the chances that, in the vast expanse of 1 quadrillion (that’s 15 zeros) gallons of water, you manage to put a 5-inch-long lure in front of a hungry fish?

Let’s do some rough math. Each year, roughly 2 million king salmon are planted between Wisconsin, Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan’s stocking efforts. Even if every one of those fish survives to maturity, that is only one king salmon per every 500 million gallons of water planted annually.

It’s kind of amazing that anyone ever catches anything.

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A floating history lesson

Green Lake has always intrigued me.

Though it is just over 60 miles from home, admittedly, I didn’t know much about this body of water.

It’s deep. It’s cold. It has lake trout and lots of people fish it. For a long time, that was the extent of my knowledge.

After some research, I discovered that Green Lake is the deepest natural inland lake in Wisconsin, reaching a depth of 236 feet. This means the water can be quite cold, hence it is a perfect habitat for inland lake trout.

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How to tie a Wolf River Rig

The Wolf River Rig is a classic among walleye anglers in Wisconsin and for good reason. They are an excellent way to ensure your bait stays in front of fish that are hanging tight to the bottom, even when the current is significant.

Whether jigging, trolling, or using dead rods, the Wolf River Rig is a proven way to get on fish.

These rigs can be used to catch a host of other species when fishing dead rods, including carp and catfish. This is a great setup to have in your back pocket and it’s very easy to put together.

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